Indicators and certifications

Indicators and certifications

For several years, Colas has used performance indicators to evaluate the Group's level of involvement in terms of our Responsible Development challenge. Measurement tools are essential for managing actions and objectives; they allow us to monitor our performance and evaluate the efficiency of our actions relative to our objectives. This is what we hope to achieve by using performance indicators. 

The indicators endeavor to reply to the following criteria:

  • Materiality: indicators must relate to real, concrete extra-financial issues in the Group. They must be observable and measureable;
  • Reliability: they must be measurable with precise accuracy (more accurately that their annual variation); the data must be collected and controlled according to strict procedures
  • Cross-disciplinary, Group-wide relevance: the indicators must be applicable throughout the Group’s different lines of business.
  • Simplicity: the indicators must be simple to calculate, irrespective of the Group business unit involved. 

An indicator is a compromise between these criteria; compliance with the last two criteria is not always possible; however compliance with the first two is mandatory. 

The following list of indicators is not exhaustive (refer primarily to the HR section for other indicators) but it provides a clear picture of the indicators implemented by the Colas Group: 

  • Certification indicators: 
    • Quality certification rate 
    • Environmental certification rate
  • Health and safety
    • Road safety 
    • Warm mix rate 
  • Recycling indicators
    • Quantity and rate of recycled materials 
    • Quantity and rate of recycled hot mix at asphalt plants 
  • Carbon
    • Carbon footprint 
    • Carbon savings
  • Local dialogue 

Local dialogue

Winning acceptance of materials production facilities from local communities that fear various forms of nuisance (odors, dust, traffic, noise, impact on the environment or health) is an increasingly sensitive issue. The Colas group has identified social acceptance as one of the key strategic challenges of Responsible Development. Such acceptance depends on dialogue with local residents and government authorities. 

Value

30% of revenue from production sites benefits from formalized local dialogue framework, including at least one annual meeting with residents, town halls and local administrations.

Purpose

The aim is to achieve a local dialogue rate of 50% by 2018.

Definition

The rate is the ratio of revenue (including internal sales) of production sites benefiting from a formalized framework for local dialogue to the total revenue of the Colas group's production sites. These production sites encompass emulsion plants, asphalt plants and quarries, as well as more varied facilities such as landfill and recycling sites and road paint, street furniture, waterproof membrane and resin manufacturing facilities.

To qualify for this indicator, a site must have implemented all of the following three actions at least once in the course of the year:

  • a communications initiative with local residents,
  • a communications initiative with local authorities,
  • formalized responses to any external complaints and requests.

Method

Period: 12-month period from October 1 to September 30

Scope: World: coverage: 100% of CAE revenue of material production sites

Quality certification rate

In connection with our Responsible Development policy, the quality of the execution of our activities and our management is critically important for the Colas group. By monitoring formalized, certified management systems we can assess the efforts made in this area. These systems are based on a group of processes that use explicit and implicit customer requirements as the main input data, with the primary goal of ensuring customer satisfaction, the key success factor for the business as a whole. They also represent a valuable management quality indicator that helps us achieve this goal. 

Value

The overall quality certification rate for business conducted by the Colas group is 71% in 2015.

Purpose

The long-term objective is a quality certification rate of 100% for all Colas group business sectors, but progress towards achieving this goal will be slow due to specific difficulties raised by the Group’s operations in North America, acquisitions currently under way, and minority interests.

Definition

The overall quality certification rate is the total revenue generated using a quality management system compared to the total revenue of the Colas group.

The quality management systems eligible for this indicator are based on ISO 9001, but other systems are also used, such as TQM (United States), EFQM (Europe), Six Sigma, or CE marking for example.

Method

Period: 12-month period from October 1 to September 30

Scope: World: coverage: all Group activities

Environmental certification rate for construction material production sites

Colas places a priority on the certification of sites producing construction materials. The environmental certification rate reflects efforts by Group companies to ensure compliance with regulatory requirements, highlights the key analysis findings, and measures the impact of the Group’s operations on the environment. This indicator provides an objective assessment of environmental performance. 

Value

The rate of environmental certification of material production units is stable and satisfactory at 60% given the wide range of locations in which the Group operates worldwide and the number of minority stakes Colas owns in these activities. 

Purpose

The target is a rate of environmental certification of materials production sites of 100%.

Definition

The rate of environmental certification of production sites is the ratio of the revenue (including internal sales) of sites operating an environmental management system to the total revenue of the Colas group's production sites. These production sites encompass emulsion plants, asphalt plants and quarries, as well as more varied facilities such as landfill and recycling sites and road paint, street furniture, waterproof membrane and resin manufacturing facilities. Production sites are those within the reporting scope for this indicator both exposed to the greatest environmental risk and facing the largest number of community-related issues, but also best equipped with the means to address these challenges.

Method

Period: 12-month period from October 1 to September 30

Scope: World: coverage: all Group activities

Road safety

As a world leader in road construction and maintenance, Colas is particularly sensitive to the issue of Road Safety and remains constantly aware of the need to protect road users as well as its own employees and reduce the excess costs entailed by high accident rates. Eighteen years ago, it decided to make Road Safety an integral part of its corporate culture. This commitment, whose implementation was spearheaded in France, took concrete form in 1997 with the signature of a Road Safety Charter with the French Inter-Ministry Mission for Road Safety. Extended throughout Europe in 2005 (European Charter on Road Safety), the approach is being rolled out progressively to all countries and territories in which the Colas group operates, respecting local cultures and regulations. Working to bring down the number of traffic accidents not only benefits Colas and its employees, but also their families and all other road users, clearly an example of a positive external effect.

Value

This philosophy is much more than a simple economic vision. It takes the form of promoting the concept of avoidability, a notion which takes account of all accidents in which our employees are involved, with or without liability on their part.

On the ground, the constant concern for Road Safety includes the work of more than 600 employees who serve as Road Safety Coordinators (awareness, feedback, training in techniques for safe driving, organization of jobsites and management of journeys, etc.) and optimization of the management of the fleet of vehicles (purchasing and maintenance) and their safety equipment (reversing assistance, speed limiters, etc.).

Purpose

The Colas group aims to continue with these actions to further improve the decreases in frequency rates that have already been achieved (-68% in France between 1997 and 2015) and on the basis of the scope considered (-45% between 2004 and 2015).

Definition

Frequency relates to the ratio of the number of traffic accidents with third parties (with or without liability) to the total number of vehicles in the scope considered. All experts agree that when considering safety, priority must be given to lowering rates, aptly summed up in the maxim “Frequency breeds severity.”

Method

Period: calendar year.

Scope: All subsidiaries throughout the world (Europe, Caribbean, North America, Africa, Indian Ocean, Australia and Asia).

Quantity of warm mix and warm mastic asphalt

Asphalt mixes are mixtures of bitumen (~ 5%) and aggregate which make up the majority of pavements. "Warm" asphalt mixes are applied with lower temperatures from 25 to 40°C, and they provide a double advantage: an improvement in working conditions, thanks to a 75% drop in the emission of fumes to which the teams are exposed at work sites, together with energy savings during asphalt mix production and the resulting reductions in greenhouse gas emissions. Colas therefore strives to actively encourage the use of these warm mixes, despite conservative resistance to this new technique from all quarters. 

Value

Warm mixes make it possible to save roughly 15% of energy during the production phase, compared to hot mixes.  The Colas Group produced 7 million tons of warm mix, some 21% of its total asphalt mix production, up 3 points from 2014, which is a 17% increase. The most significant headway was made by several Colas companies in America and in Mainland France.  Everyone in the Group remain focused and motivated to market these products worldwide, to adapt the Group’s production tools and to continue research on new technical solutions to further lower temperatures, given that there are also major gains in terms of health and safety as well.    

Purpose

The ultimate objective is to have 50% warm mix in 2018.

Definition

Total quantity of warm mix and low temperature mastic asphalt

Warm mix is the term for asphalt mix that was manufactured at a temperature at least 25°C lower than "normal" production temperatures, 3E® and ECOMAC®; mix referred to as "semi-cold", "cooled" or "semi-warm" produced in hot mix plants. "Low" or "average" temperature mastic asphalt (Neophalte BT for example) are integrated into this indicator.

Warm mix rate

This corresponds to the total quantity of warm mix compared to total production from Colas Group mix plants and asphalt mixers.

Method

Period: 12-month period from October 1 to September 30

Scope: World: coverage: all production of asphalt mix and mastic asphalt

Quantity and rate of recycled materials

This indicator was introduced in order to gauge efforts made by subsidiaries to recover waste and reuse it as construction materials, with the double advantage of limiting aggregate extraction (and thus the need to open new quarries) and reducing the volume of waste sent to landfills. Colas is now one of the world’s ten largest quarry operators. For this reason, the raw materials obtained must be utilized only as necessary, favoring the use of recycled materials for a portion of this production. In some countries and regions, recycled materials are employed to the maximum extent feasible (for example, in the Paris region).

Value

All materials recovered and recycled by the Colas group currently amounts to a volume of over 7.2 million tons in France and internationally. This is equivalent to 10% of the Group's total aggregate production, an equivalent saving of 16 quarries (based on average quarry production within the Group). This indicator only includes materials recycled within the Group's facilities, and excludes on-site recycling and contributions to external recycling platforms. The aim is thus to monitor the extent of the Group’s industrial effort in converting waste into products.

Purpose

Setting a target is not possible since recycling volumes are directly correlated with the influx of waste. The problem is that this waste arrives not only from Colas work sites but also from those of other operators and is tied to decisions made by contracting authorities to renew their infrastructure. In addition, the more eco-friendly alternatives Colas sells to its customers, the lower the influx of waste, as these alternatives are designed precisely to limit the production of waste (in-place recycling, for example).

Definition

Total quantity of materials recycled

These are not stocks, but the tonnage that has actually been screened, crushed or subjected to any other recycling process (liming, etc.).

The rate of materials recycled is the ratio of the total quantity of materials recycled to the Colas group's production from quarries and gravel pits (new aggregates).

Method

Period: 12-month period from October 1 to September 30

Quantity and rate of reclaimed asphalt pavement

Bitumen is a non-renewable petroleum-based product in limited supply. It is therefore essential to recover this binder from pavement surfaces during maintenance and demolition operations. Most pavement surfaces are made from asphalt mixes containing bitumen (~ 5%) and aggregates. Reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) is a material recovered during the planing of roads before applying a new layer of asphalt. When this material is recycled, the benefits are threefold—lower energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions, recovery of a non-renewable raw material (bitumen), and reuse of aggregates at the same time—representing savings for the customer (often in the public sector) by providing the same quality road surfaces at a lower cost.  This indicator was introduced in order to gauge the Group’s efforts to effectively recover and reuse bitumen present in road demolition materials. 

Value

The Group's total production currently incorporates an average of 14% reclaimed asphalt pavement, which represents savings of almost 5 million tons of quality aggregate, equivalent to the annual production of an average-sized refinery.

Purpose

The aim is to use 15% reclaimed asphalt pavement in the Group’s total hot mix asphalt production by 2016.

Definition

Total quantity of reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) incorporated into asphalt concrete:

Tonnage of RAP incorporated into the asphalt production of all Colas group asphalt plants. This figure only takes into account RAP from which the bitumen has also been fully extracted and recovered. It also includes recycled mastic asphalt (used for sidewalks). 

Hot mix recycling rate

The hot mix recycling rate is the ratio of the quantity of milled materials thus recycled to the Group’s total asphalt mix production.

Method

Period: 12-month period from October 1 to September 30

Scope: World: coverage: all materials production worldwide

Carbon footprint

Energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions also pose a major challenge for both environmental and economic reasons. As such, the Colas group calculated the carbon footprint of all its businesses excluding upstream use of works in progress (SCOPE 3a of ISO 14064). There are two reasons for excluding upstream activity. Using roadworks as an example, on one hand, the surfaces and structures of a road do not have any identified influence on the energy efficiency of the vehicles that use it, while on the other hand the energy used by these vehicles would completely outweigh the carbon footprint of the structure itself by 10 or 20. The indicator estimates the carbon footprint according to the GHG Protocol's accounting guidelines. 

Value

2015: 12 million tons of CO2 equivalent

This carbon footprint cannot be considered a performance indicator since it is accompanied by very wide margins of uncertainty (over 20%). Nonetheless, it provides a good order of magnitude and, during detailed analysis, allows us to identify the elements that produce the most greenhouse gases. This analysis also indicates that materials and raw materials (concrete, asphalt mix, steel etc.) are the elements with the highest emission levels and are responsible for more than two-thirds of the overall greenhouse gas emissions. Despite the large diversity of the Group's businesses, after consolidation we obtain an invariant of about 1kg CO2e per euro or per dollar of Works revenue. The Group's carbon footprint is 12 million tons of CO2e. This overall envelope allows us to estimate an order of magnitude based on which we could estimate the scope of actions taken to reduce it.

Purpose

As mentioned, the uncertainty of carbon footprint estimates is too high to set reduction targets relating to this indicator. Consequently, the Group’s policy is to achieve precise and measurable savings on specific elements of the carbon impact (eco-friendly alternatives or warm asphalt mixes, for example) and to compare these savings with the overall order of magnitude corresponding to the carbon footprint. The efforts to be accomplished each year represent about 1% to 2% of this total.

Definition

A method laid out by ISO standard 14064 based on a representative sample of business was used to complete the greenhouse gas analysis (CO2 footprint) of all Colas group businesses. This method consists in evaluating the carbon footprint of different types of business representative of the Group, deducing ratios per geographical zone and type of business (tonne CO2e per €, m3, tonne, etc.) and extrapolating for the entire Group using data for revenue, volume of product material etc. The indicator covers all Colas group business and follows ISO standard 14064 as well as GHG Protocol guidelines.

Reduction actions that are accounted for only cover areas that are measurable and precisely monitored: actual savings are significantly greater as some cannot be measured reliably.

Carbon savings

Energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions also pose a major challenge for both environmental and economic reasons. As such, the Colas group calculated the carbon footprint of all its businesses excluding upstream use of works in progress (SCOPE 3a of ISO 14064). There are two reasons for excluding upstream activity. Using roadworks as an example, on one hand, the surfaces and structures of a road do not have any identified influence on the energy efficiency of the vehicles that use it, while on the other hand the energy used by these vehicles would completely outweigh the carbon footprint of the structure itself by 10 or 20. The indicator estimates the carbon footprint according to the GHG Protocol's accounting guidelines. 

Value

We can measure the greenhouse gas emissions avoided through the actions implemented to reduce these emissions (warm mix, RAP, other types of recycling, etc.).

The Group's CO2 savings in 2015 thus shows an amount of 105,000 tons CO2e.

Purpose

See purpose of recycling and warm mixes

Definition

A method laid out by ISO standard 14064 based on a representative sample of business was used to complete the greenhouse gas analysis (CO2 footprint) of all Colas Group businesses. This method consists in evaluating the carbon footprint of different types of business representative of the Group, deducing ratios per geographical zone and type of business (tonne CO2e per €, m3, tonne, etc.) and extrapolating for the entire Group using data for revenue, volume of product material etc. The indicator covers all Colas group business and follows ISO standard 14064 as well as GHG Protocol guidelines.

Reduction actions that are accounted for only cover areas that are measurable and precisely monitored: actual savings are significantly greater as some cannot be measured reliably. In 2015, headway was made in avoiding greenhouse gas emissions with figures for emissions avoided increasing from 77,000 CO2e to 105,000 CO2, due to a lesser deterioration of efficiency at asphalt plants penalized by decreased production, to the increase in warm mix production and to the fact that plant based flux use has tripled.   

Method

Period: 12-month period from October 1 to September 30

Scope: Scope 3a in ISO 14604, applied to all Group activities

Percentage of materials production activities that carry out environmental self-evaluations using Colas checklists

The environmental self-evaluation indicator reflects the extent to which Colas evaluates its activities using its own checklists. These checklists constitute a concrete benchmark for assessing the environmental performance of the Group’s main fixed facilities and then determining progress plan priorities.

Value

The indicator on environmental self-evaluation using checklists gained five points in 2015. The movement in this indicator is tied to greater participation in Canada, Central Europe and Mainland France. It should be noted that this indicator has risen 14% since 2013. In many respects, it is the cornerstone of the policy put into practice by Colas to address environmental risk.

Purpose

The target is to reach a rate of environmental self-evaluation of materials production sites of 100%. 

Definition

Percentage of materials production activities that carry out environmental self-evaluations using Colas checklists corresponds to the CAE (revenue + intra-Group transactions and disposals) of Activities for which checklists are used over total CAE of production activities in the Group. 

A standard checklist has been prepared for practically every type of stationary facility: R&D laboratories, works center depots, workshops, hot and cold-mix plants, emulsion and binder plants, bitumen depots, quarries, gravel pits, recycling platforms, ready-mix concrete plants and prefabrication plants.

Method

Period: 12-month period from October 1 to September 30

Scope: World: coverage: 100% of CAE revenue of material production sites

Percentage of materials production activities that use a tool to manage environmental impact (environmental certification or Colas checklist)

This aggregated indicator combines environmental certification and checklists to provide a global overview of a broader scope. 

Value

The Percentage of materials production activities that use a tool to manage environmental impact remains high (82% in 2014, compared to 81% in 2015). The target is to reach 100%. This objective is ambitious considering that other companies sometimes have large and even majority stakes in some Colas entities, which prevents Colas from ensuring complete oversight. 

Target

The target is to reach a rate of environmental self-evaluation of materials production sites of 100%.

Definition

The Percentage of materials production activities that use a tool to manage environmental impact corresponds to the CAE (revenue + intra-Group transactions and disposals) of Activities with environmental certification or for which checklists are used over total CAE of production activities in the Group.

Method

Period: 12-month period from October 1 to September 30

Scope: World: coverage: 100% of CAE revenue of material production sites

Waste oil recovery rate

As part of its effort to measure its waste management performance, Colas has developed a specific indicator to monitor the management and disposal of waste oils generated by all its subsidiaries and business lines. In most countries, waste oil is subject to special hazardous waste regulations and is the main hazardous waste generated by Colas’ business activities.  In addition, ISO 14001 certifications and annual self evaluations using checklists take into account the manner in which all waste is managed.

Value

As far as waste oil is concerned, the optimum rate is roughly 80%, given the consumption, combustion of oil in machines and vehicles.  Colas in 2015 posted a percentage of 65%, up 14% from 2014.  Headway was mainly reported in North America, West and Central Africa. 

Target

The target is to recuperate 80% of waste oils. 

Definition

The indicator is calculated based on the ratio of used hydraulic and motor lubrication oil that is either disposed of by a certified channel or responsibly recovered, relative to total oils purchased.

Method

Period: 12-month period from October 1 to September 30

Scope: World: coverage: all Group activities

Percentage of CAE from aggregate production activities that take action to promote biodiversity

After analyzing its activities’ direct impact on biodiversity, Colas decided to focus its action on quarries and gravel pits. This action consists in: - setting up and monitoring a process to promote and facilitate the presence of a protected animal or plant species at the site and the living conditions it requires, or - installing beehives at the site.  Action must be conducted in partnership with local stakeholders (beekeepers, naturalists, natural park authorities, NGOs, etc.) and communicated to local communities through an educational awareness-raising campaign.

Value

Around 90 protected species currently live at the Group’s extraction sites, in addition to some fifty sites that are home to beehives. Real progress has been made since this policy was deployed in 2012, on the occasion of Colas’ Environmental Convention. This effort remains varied according to cultural contexts, enjoying strong support in France but less in the United States, for example. This indicator showed an 8% improvement in 2015, driven by road construction subsidiaries in Mainland France and Central Europe.

Definition

This indicator highlights the percentage of CAE from aggregate production activities with at least one action in favor of biodiversity over CAE of aggregate production activities. 

Method

Period: 12-month period from October 1 to September 30

Scope: World: coverage: 100% of CAE revenue of aggregate production sites